News Flash

Sheriff's Department

Posted on: December 1, 2018

Safe Ice Conditions

Ice Thickness Chart

Ice safety

If you head out to one of Wisconsin's many lakes or rivers to ice fish, snowmobile, ATV, cross-country ski, or just to enjoy a winter day, we want you to have fun and be safe. A bit of advance planning and practicing basic ice precautions can help you return home safely.

When is ice safe?

There really is no sure answer, and no such thing as 100 percent safe ice. You cannot judge the strength of ice by one factor like its appearance, age, thickness, temperature or whether the ice is covered with snow. Ice strength is based on a combination of several factors, and they can vary from water body to water body. Ice strength can also vary in different areas of the same body of water.

Know before you go

Because ice conditions vary, it is important to know before you go. The DNR does not monitor local ice conditions or the thickness of the ice. Local bait shops, fishing clubs and resorts serve winter anglers every day and often have the most up-to-date information on how thick the ice is on local lakes and rivers, as well as areas that are especially dangerous.

Safety tips

  • Dress warmly in layers.
  • Don't go alone. Head out with friends or family. Take a cell phone if available, and make sure someone knows where you are and when you are expected to return.
  • Know before you go. Don't travel in areas you are not familiar and don't travel at night or during reduced visibility.
  • Avoid inlets, outlets or narrow that may have current that can thin the ice.
  • Look for clear ice, which is generally stronger than ice with snow on it or bubbles in it.
  • Carry some basic safety gear: ice claws or picks, a cellphone in a waterproof bag or case, a life jacket and length of rope.

What to do if you fall through ice

If you fall through the ice, remain calm and act quickly.

  1. Do not remove your winter clothing. Heavy clothes can trap air, which can help provide warmth and flotation. This is especially true in a snowmobile suit.
  2. Go back toward the direction you came. That is probably where you will find the strongest ice – and what lies ahead is unknown.
  3. Place your hands and arms on the unbroken surface. This is where a pair of nails, sharpened screwdrivers or ice picks are handy in providing the extra traction you need to pull yourself up onto the ice.
  4. Kick your feet and dig in your ice picks to work your way back onto the solid ice. If your clothes have trapped a lot of water, you may have to lift yourself partially out of the water on your elbows to let the water drain before starting forward.
  5. Once back on the ice, don't try to stand up. Lie flat until you are completely out of the water, then roll away from the hole to keep your weight spread out. This may help prevent you from breaking through again.
  6. Get to a warm, dry, sheltered area and warm yourself up immediately. In moderate to severe cases of cold-water hypothermia, you must seek medical attention. Cold blood trapped in your extremities can come rushing back to your heart after you begin to warm up. The shock of the chilled blood may cause ventricular fibrillation leading to a heart attack and death!

Additional Info...
Facebook Twitter Email

Other News in Sheriff's Department

Giving Tree

The Giving Tree

Posted on: November 14, 2019
Crime Alert Network

Wisconsin Crime Alert Network

Posted on: December 28, 2014
Silver Alert

Silver Alert

Posted on: December 8, 2014
Amber Alert

Amber Alert

Posted on: December 8, 2014
Anonymous Tip Line

Anonymous Tip Line

Posted on: December 9, 2014